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As it Happened: Indigenous Peoples Leading off the People’s Climate March

Leaders of the Pack. The leaders of the indigenous contingent, which stretched for at least two blocks and included more than 400 people. (Photo: Theresa Braine)

Leaders of the Pack. The leaders of the indigenous contingent, which stretched for at least two blocks and included more than 400 people. (Photo: Theresa Braine)

Leaders of the Pack.
The leaders of the indigenous contingent, which stretched for at least two blocks and included more than 400 people. (Photo: Theresa Braine)

Media Madness. It was a media crush as reporters and photographers darted in and out of the cordoned-off area, anxious to speak to the march participants, just north of Columbus Circle. (Photo: Theresa Braine)

Media Madness.
It was a media crush as reporters and photographers darted in and out of the cordoned-off area, anxious to speak to the march participants, just north of Columbus Circle. (Photo: Theresa Braine)

Being Interviewed. Members of the media interviewed the foremost indigenous participants as the march got underway. (Photo: Theresa Braine)

Being Interviewed.
Members of the media interviewed the foremost indigenous participants as the march got underway. (Photo: Theresa Braine)

Clayton Thomas-Muller, Tar Sands. Another march leader was Clayton Thomas-Muller (in t-shirt and black baseball cap), Mathais Colomb Cree Nation (Pukatawagan), who has fought vociferously against further development in the Alberta oil sands. (Photo: Theresa Braine)

Clayton Thomas-Muller, Tar Sands.
Another march leader was Clayton Thomas-Muller (in t-shirt and black baseball cap), Mathais Colomb Cree Nation (Pukatawagan), who has fought vociferously against further development in the Alberta oil sands. (Photo: Theresa Braine)

'Save our planet!' Among the lead marchers was Rosebud Sioux Tribal Council President Cyril Scott, pictured here in the blue shirt. "We're out here to save Mother Earth," he told ICTMN. "Save our planet. Get off your lazy butts and save our planet." (Photo: Steven Fontas/stevenfontas.com)

‘Save our planet!’
Among the lead marchers was Rosebud Sioux Tribal Council President Cyril Scott, pictured here in the blue shirt. “We’re out here to save Mother Earth,” he told ICTMN. “Save our planet. Get off your lazy butts and save our planet.” (Photo: Steven Fontas/stevenfontas.com)

Media Madness Continues. The marchers were facing, ironically, Columbus Circle, which features a statue of the explorer. That was upstaged by this double-decker bus that held, among others, more media. (Photo: Theresa Braine)

Media Madness Continues.
The marchers were facing, ironically, Columbus Circle, which features a statue of the explorer. That was upstaged by this double-decker bus that held, among others, more media. (Photo: Theresa Braine)

Spirits Were High. Arms were raised to the sky, with spirits to match, as the marchers started on their 2.5-mile journey along the southern end of Central Park, then downtown and cutting west along 42nd Street to the Hudson River. (Photo: Theresa Braine)

Spirits Were High.
Arms were raised to the sky, with spirits to match, as the marchers started on their 2.5-mile journey along the southern end of Central Park, then downtown and cutting west along 42nd Street to the Hudson River. (Photo: Theresa Braine)

No Backing Down. Determined faces showed the depth of marchers' commitment to their message. (Photo: Steven Fontas/stevenfontas.com)

No Backing Down.
Determined faces showed the depth of marchers’ commitment to their message. (Photo: Steven Fontas/stevenfontas.com)

Idle No More. Idle No More, the grassroots movement that began in Canada and swept Turtle Island in 2012 and 2013, was a big presence at the march as well. (Photo: Theresa Braine)

Idle No More.
Idle No More, the grassroots movement that began in Canada and swept Turtle Island in 2012 and 2013, was a big presence at the march as well. (Photo: Theresa Braine)

400 Strong. More than 400 marchers represented Native peoples, according to the Indigenous Environmental Network. From all over the world, they stretched along Central Park South. (Photo: Theresa Braine)

400 Strong.
More than 400 marchers represented Native peoples, according to the Indigenous Environmental Network. From all over the world, they stretched along Central Park South. (Photo: Theresa Braine)

Words of a Revered Leader. The words of a revered leader of the small Pacific island nation of Kiribati, Anote Tong, were invoked for the occasion. (Photo: Theresa Braine)

Words of a Revered Leader.
The words of a revered leader of the small Pacific island nation of Kiribati, Anote Tong, were invoked for the occasion. (Photo: Theresa Braine)

Love Water. The environmental organization founded by Winona LaDuke, Honor the Earth, exhorted everyone to "Love Water." (Photo: Theresa Braine)

Love Water.
The environmental organization founded by Winona LaDuke, Honor the Earth, exhorted everyone to “Love Water.” (Photo: Theresa Braine)

Whooping Cranes. These fanciful, swooping whooping cranes danced for the length of the march. The iconic birds factor into the culture of many Indigenous Peoples across the world. (Photo: Theresa Braine)

Whooping Cranes.
These fanciful, swooping whooping cranes danced for the length of the march. The iconic birds factor into the culture of many Indigenous Peoples across the world. (Photo: Theresa Braine)

Times Square, Reborn. Once known as seedy and crime-ridden, Times Square has become a tourist mecca. On September 21 it was transformed into grassroots central, as the line between spectators and participants blurred. (Photo: Theresa Braine)

Times Square, Reborn.
Once known as seedy and crime-ridden, Times Square has become a tourist mecca. On September 21 it was transformed into grassroots central, as the line between spectators and participants blurred. (Photo: Theresa Braine)

Broadway Turns Out. The stairs of this Broadway theater along 42nd Street were packed with those jostling for a premium view.

Broadway Turns Out.
The stairs of this Broadway theater along 42nd Street were packed with those jostling for a premium view.

Tar Sands on 42nd Street. Who would have thought that one day banners emblazoned with protests against the Alberta oil sands would make their way along 42nd Street in New York City, especially carried by non-Natives. But these folks were part of it all, though not marching directly with the indigenous contingent.

Tar Sands on 42nd Street.
Who would have thought that one day banners emblazoned with protests against the Alberta oil sands would make their way along 42nd Street in New York City, especially carried by non-Natives. But these folks were part of it all, though not marching directly with the indigenous contingent.

Indian Country Today Media Network

By: ICTMN Staff

10/12/14

 

The People’s Climate March was two weeks ago now, but Indigenous People’s involvement on the front lines of stark environmental changes is anything but fading.

A recent conference at Arizona State University, Indigenous Sustainability: Implications for the Future of Indigenous Peoples and Native Nations focused solely on tribes and brought together experts from all over the world. Indigenous Peoples who traveled to New York City for the march, which drew 400,000 people, are back at work fielding climate change issues and raising awareness. A good 400 indigenous people led the march, according to theIndigenous Environmental Network.

RELATED:This Video From the People’s Climate March Will Inspire You

With all that in mind, here is a look back at how Indigenous People, led by American Indians, were among those marching at the very front—recognizing the place they hold in the debate.

RELATED:Biggest Climate March in History a Watershed Moment for Indigenous Peoples

Indigenous Peoples Essential to Climate Movement, March Organizers Say

Read more athttp://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/gallery/photo/it-happened-indigenous-peoples-leading-peoples-climate-march-photos-157312

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